A seizure of property such as a digital device will occur when there is a significant relation to an individual’s property and the search (taylor et al., 2018).

Dr. Hollington and Peers,
A primary challenge that law enforcement faces when dealing with privacy laws for investigating cyber exploitation is being able to get a search warrant without a search warrant an investigator will be able to limit their ability to obtain evidence (Digital Search Warrants, 2018). Key points that contribute to obtaining a search warrant are evidence of a crime having been committed, and probable cause to make one think the digital evidence is related to the crime and must describe the place and items to be seized (Digital Search Warrants, 2018). Another difficulty law enforcement faces are naming the specific evidence of the crime with it being digital evidence it is difficult to know what the evidence may exactly be (Taylor et al., 2018). The fourth amendment can be another factor that makes it difficult for law enforcement to investigate digital crime (Taylor et al., 2018). This amendment gives the citizens the right to be secure in their homes, persons, and effects against unreasonable search and seizures but with probable cause, a warrant may be issued and it will need to describe the specific place to be searched and the issues law enforcement facing is describing where exactly they will be searching for digital evidence.
While the fourth amendment makes it difficult for law enforcement to gather evidence it is constitutional protection the citizens of the U.S. have to protect their privacy (Taylor et al., 2018). While this amendment is not designed to protect criminals, it is designed to protect an individual’s right to a reasonable expectation of privacy (Taylor et al., 2018). A seizure of property such as a digital device will occur when there is a significant relation to an individual’s property and the search (Taylor et al., 2018). This amendment protects the citizens against inconsistent arrest and is the foundation of search warrants and other forms of surveillance in privacy laws (Fourth Amendment, n.d.).
References
Digital Search Warrants. (2018, September 13). Law Enforcement Cyber Center. Retrieved October 3, 2022, from https://www.iacpcybercenter.org/prosecutors/digital-search-warrants/
Fourth Amendment. (n.d.). LII / Legal Information Institute. Retrieved October 3, 2022, from https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/fourth_amendment
Taylor, R., Fritsch, E., Liederbach, J., Saylor, M., & Tafoya, W. (2018, January 18). Cyber Crime and Cyber Terrorism (What’s New in Criminal Justice) (4th ed.). Pearson.

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