ENGLISH 113 Research Paper PAPER LENGTH: at least 1,200 WORDS (6-8 pages) MLA FO

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ENGLISH 113 Research Paper
PAPER LENGTH: at least 1,200 WORDS (6-8 pages)
MLA FORMAT:
Typed, double spaced; no greater than 1″ margin on all sides; standard font (such as Arial or
Times New Roman); font size no greater than 12 pt.; your name, my name, course and section number, and date typed in the upper left-hand corner of paper, single-spaced; for page numbering, your last name + the page # in the upper right-hand corner of the paper. Your paper must include a works-cited page, formatted MLA style, and it must use MLA citations of sources in the body of the paper.
SOURCES REQUIRED. At LEAST FIVE, including:
** 3 researched sources, from ProQuest Central and/or The Literary
Resource Center (these are CPCC online library research databases);
** The primary source/sources, which is actually the literary work(s) you’re discussing (you
must use examples from the work).
Note:
Do not use non-academic, Internet sources (such as people’s homepages; commercial Web sites; an online encyclopedia; Wikipedia; Google search engines) for research.
PLAGIARISM
To plagiarize is to USE another person’s words or ideas as if they are yours. Plagiarism is a serious offense that can be grounds for failing a course; the minimum penalty is an “F” on the assignment. You must use MLA parenthetical citation style to cite all sources you use and have a Works Cited page at the end of your paper.
PAPER TOPICS
1. Choose two stories from those read for the course and compare how religion/religious issues are addressed in those stories.
2. Choose one or more stories and/or one or more poems from those read that deal with issues of youth and innocence and compare/contrast how the different stories/poems deal with this subject.
3. Compare and contrast two stories from the textbook, examining the themes of those two works and how the writers use one or more specific forms of irony (verbal, situational, or dramatic).
Stories/poems I recommend writing about:
“An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge,”
“A Rose For Emily,”
“The Lottery,”
“The Blue Hotel,”
“Young Goodman Brown,”
“The Jilting of Granny Weatherall,”
“The Black Cat,”
“The Yellow Wallpaper,”
“A Good Man Is Hard To Find,”
“Diving Into the Wreck,” or
“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.”
I recommend these because they have the most sources from research you can find.
How To Use Researched Sources
1) Look for sources that support (agree with) the points you want to make in your paper
(and quote from those sources).
2) If you find sources that disagree with your point of view, you may use those sources
(quote from them) to contrast with your point of view.
3) If you find sources that add a different dimension to looking at the work, one that may be different from your analysis, you may use those sources to contrast your p.o.v. (and quote from them).
***Remember, to claim a source as being used in your paper, it must be quoted from or paraphrased and cited (parenthetically) in the body of your paper. Just listing a source you found but didn’t use on the works cited page is not permitted.
Examples of quoting:
-Quoting from/discussing two lines of a poem:
Addressing his beloved in an attempt to win her sexual favors, the speaker of the poem argues that death gives them no time to waste: “But at my back I always hear / Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near”
(21–2 2).
-Quoting from/discussing a passage from a story:
When a neighbor suggests that the lottery should be abandoned, Old Man
Warner responds, “There’s always been a lottery” (284).
-Quoting from a source:
Arguing that fate has little to do with the tragedy that befalls Oedipus,
Bernard Knox writes that “the catastrophe of Oedipus is that he discovers his own identity; and for his discovery he is first and last responsible” (6).
-Using paraphrased ideas from a source:
One of the final clues in the story, the irregular stitching in Minnie’s quilt patches, connects immediately with Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters. In the late nineteenth century, explains Elaine Hedges, precise needlework was valued for more than its durability. It was a source of pride to women, a way of gaining status in the community of other women (62).
https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.cpcc.edu/central
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