I need three 90 word responses to my classmates posts. Respond as if you are a c

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I need three 90 word responses to my classmates posts. Respond as if you are a classmate writing to another classmate. I need 1 source per response. 1. Michael ZMOT – This is the Zero Moment of truth, then a possible customer is doing research on the product, with interest in purchasing it (Cohen, 2018).
With Black Friday coming up, I am currently looking at workout supplements. My first step is to look at brands I have seen in the past and going to their websites/social media to learn more. What I learned here is labeling and information are important to grab a possible customer’s attention.
FMOT – This is the First Moment of Truth. When a consumer is either standing in front of the product in person or viewing the product page online, the moment a customer is deciding to purchase the product (Cohen, 2018).
Since I try to support my local supplement stores (Mom & Pop establishments), I will go to their stores to view the product in person, asking if the owners/employees have used the product or what customers are saying about it. This helps give me an unbiased review and feedback. From this, I learned that when selling your product with other competitors, providing samples and additional information is helpful for those who are unable to decide.
SMOT – With a Second Moment of Truth, the customer has already begun using your product, discovering if they will want to buy it again (Cohen, 2018).
This is where I hope my purchase was a good choice. Since I use a variety of supplements, some work better for other needs, such as focus or energy. However, supplements work differently with different people, and I have a naturally high tolerance. This means, a product that might work for most, has less impact on me. If I made the right choice, then I would instantly become a fan. And if by the time I finish the product, I still get similar results, I would engage more with the company and purchase other supplements from them. From what I learned, this is where quality and value play an important part in a product purchased. Cheaper products can deliver similar results, however, they are typically short term and you might adapt to the ingredients. Which brings up that old tale, you get what you pay for.
TMOT – The Third Moment of Truth, after the use of a product, they become a fan, wanting to support the company or product with continued purchases and social media interactions (Cohen, 2018).
Once I discover a product that I enjoy, I do not mind engaging with the company. In fact, I will put in more effort or go out of my way, to engage with the company. This is to support a company I enjoy their products and in hopes that I might get recognized enough, that my next order may include some extra goodies. In this instance, a company can gain further exposure and loyalty by rewarding those who engage the most after a recent order. This helps retain a positive culture and returning customers.
Reference
Cohen, H. (2018, March 26). Marketing: The 4 Moments of Truth [Chart]. Heidi Cohen. https://heidicohen.com/marketing-the-4-moments-of-truth-chart/
2. Christie As outlined by MYcustomer (n.d.), the four Moments of Truth (MOT) in marketing are defined as:
Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT): the event of a consumer searching for information (e.g., online) and making decisions about brands in that instance.
First Moment of Truth (FMOT): the point of time when a consumer sees a product/service for the first time and develops an opinion about it.
Second Moment of Truth (SMOT): After purchasing/using the product, the subsequent moments that incorporate the customer’s experience. Ultimate Moment of Truth (UMOT): After experience with the brand, customer posts some form of positive content (advocates) that expresses their use and enjoyment of the product service.
The following are examples of when I experienced each type of MOT:
Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT): just last night I researched an injury on my dogs’ nose. I learned that I need to put nose balm on his nose (for dogs) to help treat the injury, which I do not have on hand. I proceeded to type in “nose balm for dogs” on google search and was taken to a product found on Amazon. I then proceeded to check out a few different brands.
First Moment of Truth (FMOT): Expanding on the example above, I found an organic nose balm product that sparked my interest. I liked that it was organic and vegan. It was inexpensive and had good reviews. I purchased and am now waiting for my product to be delivered.
Second Moment of Truth (SMOT): I recently received a product that I purchased for my daughter for Christmas. It was the first time I purchased with the company. When I received the product, I was pleased with its quality.
Ultimate Moment of Truth (SMOT): Expanding on the example above (Christmas gift), I “liked” the product on a Facebook page and made a positive comment about the quality of the product.
As a marketer, I would encourage frequent feedback from customers so I could validate if their experience was positive and if not, learn why and adjust/improve where feasible. MOTs provide opportunities to change the perception of the business by learning directly from the customer’s experience with the brand/product and/or service.
Reference:
Mycustomer. (n.d.). Moments of truth. Retrieved from https://www.mycustomer.com/hr-glossary/moments-of-truth
3. Angelica The four moments of truth are key for businesses and consumers alike; each moment is relatively quick and begins with the slightest bit of intrigue or need. Many people today are likely to rely heavily on the interwebs for reviews and information regarding products, services, fact finding to help with a problem, or sometimes even just to prove someone else wrong; this is called the Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT). Although each of these aspects describes somewhat different circumstances, they all are the result of an individual turning to their laptop or phone to identify a service, product, or fact to assist in solving a problem (Cote, 2020).
Say for example, you’re hungry and are in an unfamiliar area so you decide to open Yelp and select restaurants near me. As soon as the list of available establishments populates, you are now in the First Moment of Truth (FMOT) and “confronted with a choice of product or service to buy” (Cote, 2020). So you pick a restaurant and when you first walk in you notice how filthy the tables and service pieces are; you’ve now entered into the Second Moment of Truth (SMOT) when you have a positive or negative experience with the product or company. If you actively post on Yelp, you’ll end up leaving some sort of feedback (place was filthy, 0/10, do not recommend) or even more likely you’ll turn around and depart the establishment. This is the Third Moment of Truth (TMOT) when a consumer engages with the company to “provide feedback or react in some way to their experience” (Cote, 2020).
As a marketer, it would be beneficial to buy advertisement space so my campaign may be sponsored and shown to consumers during the FMOT. As we developed our marketing mix this past week, it became obvious that the individuals/employees chosen to represent the business will directly impact the SMOT; whether we are speaking from a personal, professional standpoint or their work ethic and effort to maintain a clean environment. Additionally, asking for incentivized customer feedback (TMOT) has the ability to provide insight on how the business is being received and any improvements may be implemented. These are relatively within the marketers reach, however the ZMOT is much more difficult unless you somehow have your product or service input into a web browser so frequently that it will auto-populate when people initially seek out an answer for their problem.
References
Cote, J. (2020, July 02). What Are the 4 Ps of Marketing and Are They Relevant? Retrieved from Southern New Hampshire University: https://www.snhu.edu/about-us/newsroom/2017/12/the-four-ps-of-marketing

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