There are 3 separate questions I needed answer for a final project. I have playe

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There are 3 separate questions I needed answer for a final project. I have played them out as follows the literature that needs to be cited are Billy Budd-Melville Jazz Ezra Pound My Last Duchess The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock The house of Bernarda Alba The film Beau Travail 1. Concept Map: Imagine that you have been hired as a T.A. for ENG 300, and you’ve now been asked to create a thorough, detailed, cohesive study guide for a final exam, which will include written essays about course texts and overarching course themes, as well as objective short-answer questions testing specific content knowledge. Your study guide will take the form of a concept map and an accompanying essay. Together, the concept map and essay should synthesize the materials for ENG 300 in a clearly organized, easy-to- navigate format. The guide should be comprehensive and detailed, and should help students internalize the materials deeply, such that they are prepared to write about them. Like most T.A.s, your job is not only to show that you understand the materials, but to “translate” them for someone trying to get the best possible grasp of what was covered, and to put your own stamp on the course content. After all, teaching material to someone else is the best way to learn it for yourself. (You and your students can also take this guide with them for reference in future English courses.) With that scenario in mind, your job is create a polished, complex, well-structured diagram that synthesizes, visualizes, and organizes the relationships among our course texts and ideas: connections, patterns, hierarchies, and structures that help us visualize how texts and ideas build on each other. While showing thorough understanding of the course materials, organize them so as to give us an insightful grasp of the most important ideas from our course. Reconstruct the conversations and arguments that should “stick” with you and your students. For example, you could have a shape on the concept of “genre”; this could then connect to poetry, drama, and fiction, which could then connect to different concepts of each of those. The best maps will advance our thinking further: by giving shape the material, you will help us rethink the relationships among our course texts and ideas. Your map may include information of various forms—links, text, images, quotes, bullet points, concepts, short descriptions or paraphrases, arguments, etc. Quantity and quality both matter. As you aim for a comprehensive presentation of the material, it’s also crucial that you organize the material clearly and effectively, that you give the materials a clear structure and sense of interconnection. Remember: form generates content. This is as true of your map as it is of literature. How will the structure and design of your map help us engage with its ideas? You may use whatever technology you like to create your diagram—Google Drawings, Coggle (https://coggle.it/), etc., or you may draw it out longhand and then scan it as a PDF. I recommend not spending too much time on fancy technology; keep it simple, so long as the ultimate result is complex, comprehensive, and organized. How you organize the map is up to you, but each map should include the following: Give your concept map a real, descriptive title (not just “Concept Map”). ? Consider concepts related to literary analysis (genre, form, etc.) and concepts that help ?with specific texts. You can also consider recurring themes explored in our course texts. ?Make use of terms from the handouts distributed in class, from lectures and Zooms, etc. ? Both novels, the play, the film, and at least three poems must be accounted for in some way, in the map and/or in the essay. You don’t need to include huge quotations from each text, but think about how our texts speak to each other, and how they shed new light on course concepts, themes, critical skills, etc. ? You may submit the map in the same file as the rest of your exam, or as a separate file. Below is a (shrunken) map completed for a different course, just so you can see what yours ?might look like. It does not have to look exactly like this; just an example. ?Finally, write an essay (500+ words) describing the cardinal principles that your students as they work through the content of your map. Basically, create a “reader’s guide” that clarifies specific concepts, relationships, and “moves” in your map. While there might not be room for extensive textual analysis in the essay, a few specific examples may help to illustrate some of your points. Having a central thesis or decisive point of focus is a good idea. 2. Create a glossary of 8-10 literary terms, concepts, tools, or keywords that you think are particularly crucial and useful to the study of literature. In your own words (~70-100 words apiece), explain each term carefully and precisely, then find a specific example from an assigned course text to exemplify that concept. Aim for a total of 600-800 words (which would be, say, 60-100 words apiece). You may organize your glossary alphabetically, conceptually, by genre, or by some other means, but it shouldn’t be random; there should be some sense of order or method. ? 3. T.S. Eliot’s “Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” consists of an interior stream-of-consciousness that lays out Prufrock’s peculiar combination of neuroses and insecurities, constructed through a complex amalgam of other text: Prufrock quotes Hamlet, Dante, Chaucer, and a bunch of other stuff (which we haven’t read in this class). The poem also moves between ? 3 open form (free verse) and closed form (meter and rhyme) as Prufrock moves in and out of time, in and out of the city, in and out of his own mind, in and out of the human species… Write a parody or imitation of a selected sections of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” Write your own poem of, say, 20 lines (give or take) in which, (a) you develop a monologue of a protagonist (you choose who/what this protagonist is); (b) you build in some allusions to other texts (from our course, but you can also go off-list if you want); and (c) you experiment at least a little bit with poetic form, meter, and rhyme (maybe a line or two in iambic pentameter, just to show you can do it). Also, (d) give the poem your own title. Append, to your new literary masterpiece, a short explanation of your poem: its connections to (or revisions of) the original; the allusions you’ve chosen to integrate; how you’ve constructed your speaker; where you’ve done some work with meter/rhyme in comparison to Eliot; etc. Show how you’ve used this exercise to work through the original text one more time; think of your poem both as a literary text in its own right, and as a work of criticism that reflects anew on the original. Remember that an adaptation is a palimpsest: what does your revision do to change Eliot’s poem into a new one, and how does Eliot’s original poem continue to speak through your own? If a future student were reading your poem in ENG 300 alongside Eliot’s, how would they pull the two together? Aim for at least 20-30 lines of poetry, and an explanatory essay of, say, 400+ words.

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